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Book Review: The Magic Bus by Rory Maclean

Whether it’s because we like to commemorate anniversaries of events or a perception, right or wrong, that it was a time of promise, we have a seemingly never-ending fascination with the 1960s. With Magic Bus: On the Hippie Trail From Istanbul to India, Rory MacLean seeks to explore a somewhat unique element of ’60s culture. […]

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Weekend Edition: 3-28

Random Observations

Good news, bad news. My youngest daughter found out this morning she got accepted at the college to which she is probably most wants to go. The bad news is tuition is $40,000+ annually.

Wednesday night’s performance by The Blue Note 7 is already a strong candidate for concert of the year.

A […]

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Book Review: A Free Life by Ha Jin

Some contend that the term literary fiction is so overused and broad, it now amounts to little more than a name for a recent genre. And if you’re an illiterati like me, you might consider literary fiction to be like pornography — I can’t define it but “I know it when I see it.” Applying […]

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Newspapers: “No profit” to “nonprofit”?

As a former newspaper reporter, I’m one who is still addicted to and tends to bemoan the disappearance and struggles of daily newspapers. That’s despite the fact that a lot of newspapers aren’t what they once were (and who am I to really judge whether that’s good or bad.)

U.S. Senator Ben Cardin (D.-Md.) has […]

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Midweek Music Moment: Dark Side of the Moon, Pink Floyd

This week’s moment is shorter than usual for a couple reasons. One is work commitments. The other is more basic: what else can you really say about Dark Side Of The Moon? The latter means I’m not going to talk about content as much as another notable element of the LP — its chart history.

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A bailout that rests in our own hands

Chris Hedges has never been known to pull punches or really sugarcoat his view of things. In fact, he engages in equal opportunity critique, as evidenced by a couple of his books, When Atheism Becomes Religion: America’s New Fundamentalists (originally titled I Don’t Believe in Atheists) and American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War […]

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