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Book Review: The Asylum of Dr. Caligari by James Morrow

Most people probably don’t start pondering the power of art after seeing the classic German silent film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. But then author James Morrow isn’t your average person. After all, he spent the 1990s “killing God” in The Godhead Trilogy. A self-described “scientific humanist,” Morrow’s last several novels explored the scientific worldview […]

Weekend Edition: 5-27

Interesting Reading in the Interweb Tubez

The Devastating Effects of Dental Inequality in America (“What these medical professionals lacked in compassion, they at least balanced with frankness: They were effectively admitting that much of the nation should be allowed to have their teeth rot.”)

Bookish Linkage

Lawyer asks court to require Mississippi officials to read […]

Weekend Edition: 5-20

Interesting Reading in the Interweb Tubez

We need ecstasy and cocaine in place of Prozac and Xanax (“We’d rather stick to antidepressants of minimal therapeutic impact, not because they guard against addiction – they don’t – but because of a puritanical aversion to supplying unearned happiness and, along with it, a deep-seated belief that people […]

Book Review: The Trouble with Reality by Brooke Gladstone

It will be easy for Trumpists and conservatives to ignore Brooke Gladstone’s new book. Not only is she a member of the mainstream media, she’s spent the last 30 years working for two bastions of biased liberal media, WNYC and NPR. They’ll justify their dismissal of the book with fleeting perusals, its reviews or perhaps […]

Weekend Edition: 5-13

Interesting Reading in the Interweb Tubez

Why Liberals Aren’t as Tolerant as They Think (“One theory is that the effects of liberals’ unique traits and worldviews on prejudice are swamped by a simple fact of humanity: We like people similar to us.”)

Fighting With Their Fists to Put a Period in a Basket (“What […]

Book Review: Beyond Bedlam’s Door by Mark Rubinstein

Although case studies are a well-recognized form of scholarship, in the nonfiction aisles of retail bookstores it can become a sobriquet for “war stories.” Their presence and popularity grew immensely with the popularity of books by neurologist Oliver Sacks. Many authors, though, have difficulty equalling his prowess.

Mark Rubinstein deftly avoids the many pitfalls of […]