Blogroll

Book Review: Death of an Assassin by Ann Marie Ackerman

For the second time in a year, I’ve had book encounters with 19th century European assassins who eventually fled to the United States and began new lives under different names. The first was Sergei Degaev, who assassinated the chief of Tsar Nicholas’s security organization in 1883. Sixteen years later he would become a popular professor […]

Weekend Edition: 8-26

Interesting Reading in the Interweb Tubez

The Long Lost Thrill of Doing Nothing (“Spontaneous idleness challenges an urge that’s deeply ingrained in many of us, especially in modern, secular societies: the persistent need to feel like we’re making something of our time.”)

A Most American Terrorist: The Making of Dylann Roof (“Roof is what […]

Weekend Edition: 8-19

Bulletin Board

My review of The Irrationalist has been republished at BookGlow

Interesting Reading in the Interweb Tubez

America At The End of All Hypotheticals (“…despicable speech is protected by the First Amendment, and should remain so.”)

The Fallout From Sportswriting’s Filthiest Fuck-Up (“A butchered score? Not such a big deal. An underage soccer […]

American regression

Every day the onslaught continues, more and more straw falling on the camel’s back. And Trump lending aid and comfort to Nazis and racists is just further evidence that we’re backsliding from decades-old principles. This is especially so when both he and Congress want to deprive millions of health insurance and make sure corporations and […]

Weekend Edition: 8-12

Bulletin Board

There’s been a couple additions to the Curmudgeon’s Gallery

Interesting Reading in the Interweb Tubez

How America Lost Its Mind (“We have passed through the looking glass and down the rabbit hole. America has mutated into Fantasyland.”)

W.W.E. the People (“Trump didn’t create the problem — he exploited it.”)

Blog Headline of […]

Book Review: The Irrationalist by Andrew Pessin

Historical fiction is unique in several ways. In particular, while all fiction — at least good fiction — requires imagination and intelligence, historical fiction, according to bestselling author Alexander Chee, deals with “the plausibly hypothetical” and describes “what might have happened within what happened.” The constraints of real events, people and ways of life often […]