Not to say I told you so, but…

Following the Hobby Lobby decision, I wrote that one of the more problematic issues I saw was that the decision was framed in terms of the “sincerely held religious beliefs” of the company’s owners. My concern was this could result in judging a person’s beliefs. The Satanic Temple is stepping through that door.

It is [...]

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Potential effects of ‘sincerely held religious beliefs’

I have a number of problems with the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision on health insurance coverage of contraceptives and religious freedom. But the concept that corporations can freely exercise religion isn’t the main one. I’m more concerned about what I perceive to be far broader and more problematic issues.

The decision is framed in [...]

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Is there irony in the Supreme Court’s buffer zone ruling?

Among the big items in Thursday’s news cycle was the U.S. Supreme Court striking down a Massachusetts law creating a buffer zone around abortion clinics. It didn’t take long for a number of observers to pick up on an unusual perspective on the decision. Federal law makes it illegal to “parade, stand, or move in [...]

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Losing out with judicial elections

During Tuesday’s primary, voters in my judicial circuit (two counties) will see a “nonpolitical” ballot for Circuit Court judge, the state’s trial court level. We will choose which two of three candidates will face each other in one of the two contested races for judge in the circuit in the November election. (There’s only two [...]

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Justice Clarence Thomas still pushing state theocracy

This week’s Supreme Court decision on prayer before municipal meetings wasn’t really that surprising. Particularly given the make-up of the Court, it’s a fairly narrow decision that is based in large part on its particular facts. Yet while it got plenty of attention, one thing that went largely unmentioned is something I blogged about in [...]

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Defending Socrates — or at least his method

Legal education has been under attack from inside and outside the legal profession for any number of years. But with the recent economic crunch and the lack of jobs, one of the targets is the Socratic method. One of the more recent attacks came in a blog post at the Chronicle of Higher Education, where [...]

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