Blogroll

Weekend Edition: 6-30

Interesting Reading in the Interweb Tubes

The Perfect Listen (“It’s usually anywhere between the second and fifth listen that fragments that maybe weren’t evident on first glance suddenly come at you or your brain makes a connection that could only have been made indirectly. That’s when a song start to mean something to you.”)

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E-books, libraries and instant gratification

In its latest look at libraries in the digital age, the Pew Internet Project last week released a report on libraries, library users and e-books. The study confirms some of what I’ve been thinking about e-books lately and the continuing technological draw of instant gratification.

Perhaps the lead item in the study was that 58% […]

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Weekend Edition: 6-23

Interesting Reading in the Interweb Tubes

In Praise of Leisure (“The irony, however, is that now that we have at last achieved abundance, the habits bred into us by capitalism have left us incapable of enjoying it properly.”) (via)

Bookish Linkage

Books that shaped America

Ten life lessons we learned from children’s books

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Book Review: The Martians Have Landed!: A History of Media-Driven Panics and Hoaxes by Robert Bartholomew and Benjamin Radford

It’s an aphorism that is phrased various ways. Yet the truth general truth of “It’s not the idea, it’s the execution” holds true in almost any endeavor. Books are no exception.

Sociologist Robert Bartholomew and Benjamin Radford, deputy editor of Skeptical Inquirer magazine, have an intriguing concept in exploring the media’s spread of hoaxes and […]

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Weekend Edition: 6-16

Interesting Reading in the Interweb Tubes

40 years after Watergate, Nixon was far worse than we thought (“All reflected a mind-set and a pattern of behavior that were uniquely and pervasively Nixon’s: a willingness to disregard the law for political advantage, and a quest for dirt and secrets about his opponents as an organizing principle […]

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Book Review: X-Events: The Collapse of Everything by John Casti

Too big to fail.

It’s a phrase that has become so ubiquitous that even the Federal Reserve has a definition on one of its web sites. From the Fed’s standpoint, an organization is “too big to fail” when it is “so important to markets and their positions [are] so intertwined with those of other [institutions] […]

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